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What is a Gas Safety Certificate?

A Gas Safety Certificate (or record) is a document that should be given to you once a gas engineer has finished any gas work at your property such as a service or safety check, and details specifically what has been inspected and any further issues there may be.

Gas safety is incredibly important, without it you’re not only putting your appliance at risk but also yourself and the people living in your property too. 

This is why a gas safety check or inspection is carried out to make sure your appliances work correctly, safely and efficiently. The check can’t just be carried out by anyone; it must be a Gas Safe registered engineer.

There is no set template from the Gas Safe register for what the form should look like so they may vary slightly depending on who conducts the work, but it should always include key information such as:

  • a description of and the location of each appliance or flue checked
  • the name, registration number and signature of the individual carrying out the check
  • the date on which the appliance or flue was checked
  • the address of the property at which the appliance or flue is installed
  • the name and address of the landlord (or their agent where appropriate)
  • any safety-related defect identified and any remedial action taken

An example can be found here.

Who needs a Gas Safety Certificate?

Homeowners

As a homeowner you are not legally required to hold a Gas Safety Certificate but it is strongly recommended to have an annual check or service of your gas appliances to check they are working safely and efficiently. It is worth noting that some home insurance policies require Gas Safety certificates for policies to be valid so it might be worth checking with your provider.

It's also worth noting that having an annual service is also required to ensure the validity of your boiler warranty.

Landlords

As a landlords you have a legal requirement to have an annual gas safety check and provide a certificate as proof. The inspection should be done on all gas appliances in each of your properties, and you should receive a copy of the certificate to keep for your records, as well as providing a copy to your tenants.

Gas Safety Records

By law, a copy of the Landlord Gas Safety Record received after the annual service should be given to current tenants within 28 days of the service. This will also need to be provided to new tenants at the start of their tenancy.

Maintenance

It is the landlord’s responsibility to ensure that all gas appliances, fittings, chimneys and flues are kept in good and safe condition at all times.

There are no specific requirements for landlords to keep maintenance records, but they will need to be able to show that pipework and appliances have been regularly maintained and required repairs have been completed.

How do I get a Gas Safe Certificate?

You can get a Gas Safe Certificate for your home by booking an appointment with a registered Gas Safe engineer who will come out and do all necessary checks on your gas appliances, this is usually done on an annual basis.

Your engineer is trained to check a number of things when looking at your gas appliances.

  • Your appliance should be operating at the right pressure and the air supply to that appliance should be suitable.
  • The flue of your appliance is clear, so that waste gases can be disposed of safely.
  • The device itself is working as it should and is not a threat to anyone’s safety.

After the gas safety check has been completed your engineer can provide you with a copy of the documents which will explain what has been checked and any issues found.

What is the cost of a Gas Safe Certificate? 

The gas safety certificate cost can vary depending on how many appliances you have in your home; there is no fixed price. It can range from £35 to £150, depending on your engineer. 

For a single gas appliance, the cost of a certificate will set a landlord back around £60. For more than one gas appliance, the price will increase per item/per certificate.

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